Mother’s Day Memorials

Today can be so hard for so many, Mother’s Day Memorials could be a way to do something positive in memory of a loved one.

Brief History

Did you know that Mother’s Day was not originally about Mum’s at all? On the 4th Sunday of Lent, people would visit their ‘Mother Church’. Over time, this transformed into the same day that staff would visit their own mother too. A tradition was to take her a Simnel cake.

As more years passed, the tradition of thanking our actual mothers, rather than the church itself moved from Mothering Sunday to Mothers Day.

However, this is only true in the UK.

International Mother’s Day

In other countries around the world, different days are used to celebrate Mothers. In the US, an official day (2nd Sunday in May), was created by Anna Jarvis in 1908, and formalised in 1914. Interestingly, she then campaigned against celebrating her own festival when she saw it become an overly commercial event.

Australia celebrate on 9th May. In Norway, Mother’s Day is the 2nd Sunday in February. You can find a list of the different international days of celebration for mothers here. 

Mother’s Day Memorials

Often breakfast in bed is the best treat for a mum, but there are also many ways to celebrate the life of a treasured mother no longer with us.

  1. Taking flowers to a favourite place, or special location.
  2. Planting Spring bulbs in the Autumn, that will flower for Mother’s Day.
  3. Using a Living Memorial Kit to plant a loved one’s ashes, to grow into new life.
  4. Make a photograph bunting or album of loved ones to hang at home.
  5. Take a walk around a place full of happy memories.
  6. Reminisce with younger family members, telling stories and sharing history.
  7. Eating or drinking their favourite foods, or using a family recipe to make a meal.
  8. Listening to their favourite music, or watching a well loved film of theirs.
  9. Using our sense of smell to evoke fond memories, they may have worn a specific perfume or always smelt of something unique.
  10. When memories are still raw, simply reflecting and allowing ourselves to cry can also be a powerful memorial.